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How can i explain the equation of d h x v to students ?

d/h x v is used with dosage calculations in the medical office. medical assistants use this calculation to prepare injections for their patients.

Answers:

TH

The best way to explain this formula to students is to tell them what d (desired dose), h (dose you have, or dose on hand), and v (volume), and provide a couple examples. (An example: Morphine Sulfate 4mg IV ordered, available dosage is 10mg in 2 ml. How many ml will the nurse administer? 4/10 x 2= 0.8ml) Go over other examples, and they should be able to do the calculations on their own from there. I am not terribly fond of this formula, since it is easy to overlook conversions that need to be done, and can lead to big mistakes. I prefer to start by recognizing the units I need to end up with to get the proper dosage, then make an estimate of what I think the dose should be, then carry out the calculations. If my estimated dose is very different than my calculated dose, I can rework the problem. I know this sounds more complicated, but it actually works faster for me, and I know for sure I have figured it out right. I have heard so many stories about medication errors that resulted in patients receiving as much as 100x the ordered dose, due to a math error. I always wonder if the person administering the medication had taken the time to make a rough estimate of the dosage before doing the calculation, they would realize that it is not reasonable to have to use 4 vials of a medication for a single dose, or that a heparin drip probably shouldn’t be running at 250 ml/hour.

NE

Need to explain the variable, what it means and then have them plug in. Honestly not enough information.

I

I want to praise Sarah for her common sense. She said, “Think! Make an estimate. Do the math. If the estimate and the math don’t agree… Go to “Step 1”.
When I taught 5th and 6th graders I would scribble “DMAMS” on the board. The kids thought I was swearing until “we” figured out it meant “Does my answer make sense?”